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Levi Price
Levi Price

Faith Into Action: Daisaku Ikeda's Teachings on Buddhism and Its Application to Daily Life



Faith Into Action: How to Download and Read Daisaku Ikeda's Book for Free




Have you ever heard of Daisaku Ikeda, the renowned Buddhist leader and peace activist? Have you ever wondered what his book Faith Into Action is about and how it can inspire you to live a more meaningful and fulfilling life? If so, you're in luck. In this article, I'm going to show you how you can download and read his book for free in PDF format. But first, let me tell you a bit more about who he is and what his book is about.




Faith Into Action Daisaku Ikeda Pdf Free



Introduction




Who is Daisaku Ikeda and what is his book about?




Daisaku Ikeda is a Japanese Buddhist philosopher, educator, author, poet, and president of Soka Gakkai International (SGI), a global network of lay Buddhists that promotes peace, culture, and education. He was born in 1928 in Tokyo, Japan, and became a follower of Nichiren Buddhism at the age of 19. Since then, he has dedicated his life to spreading the humanistic teachings of Buddhism and engaging in dialogue with various leaders and thinkers from different fields and backgrounds.


One of his most popular books is Faith Into Action, which was first published in 2005. It is a collection of his writings on various topics related to Buddhism and its application to daily life. The book covers themes such as happiness, human dignity, compassion, wisdom, courage, justice, dialogue, peace, culture, education, environment, health, family, work, friendship, youth, aging, death, and more. The book is divided into four parts: Part One: The Individual; Part Two: Interpersonal Relations; Part Three: Society; Part Four: Peace.


Why should you read Faith Into Action?




There are many reasons why you should read Faith Into Action. Here are some of them:



  • It will inspire you to live with a positive attitude and a sense of purpose.



  • It will teach you how to overcome your challenges and difficulties with faith and perseverance.



  • It will help you develop your inner potential and creativity.



  • It will guide you to cultivate harmonious relationships with others based on respect and dialogue.



  • It will encourage you to contribute to the betterment of society and the world based on compassion and justice.



  • It will enrich your knowledge and understanding of Buddhism and its relevance to modern times.



How can you get a free PDF copy of the book?




If you're interested in reading Faith Into Action but don't have the money or time to buy or borrow a physical copy of the book, don't worry. There are ways to get a free PDF copy of the book online. However, before I tell you how, let me warn you about some of the legal and ethical issues involved in downloading free PDFs.


Main Body




Section 1: Daisaku Ikeda's Life and Achievements




His early years and conversion to Buddhism




Daisaku Ikeda was born on January 2, 1928, in Tokyo, Japan. He was the fifth of eight children in a poor family that ran a seaweed business. He grew up during the turbulent times of World War II and experienced the horrors of war, poverty, and discrimination. He also suffered from poor health and was diagnosed with tuberculosis at the age of 17.


It was at this time that he encountered Nichiren Buddhism through his mentor, Josei Toda, who was the second president of Soka Gakkai, a lay Buddhist organization that follows the teachings of Nichiren Daishonin, a 13th-century Japanese Buddhist reformer. Toda taught Ikeda the philosophy of human revolution, which is the transformation of one's life and character through the practice of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, the title of the Lotus Sutra, the highest teaching of Buddhism. Ikeda was deeply moved by Toda's words and decided to join Soka Gakkai and devote himself to Buddhism.


His leadership of Soka Gakkai and SGI




After recovering from his illness, Ikeda became an active member of Soka Gakkai and worked closely with Toda to spread Buddhism in Japan and abroad. He became Toda's closest disciple and successor, and assumed the presidency of Soka Gakkai in 1960, at the age of 32. Under his leadership, Soka Gakkai grew rapidly and expanded its activities to various fields such as education, culture, politics, and social welfare. He also founded several institutions such as Soka University, Soka Women's College, Min-On Concert Association, Tokyo Fuji Art Museum, Institute of Oriental Philosophy, and more.


In 1975, Ikeda established Soka Gakkai International (SGI), a global network of lay Buddhists that shares the same vision and values as Soka Gakkai. Today, SGI has more than 12 million members in 192 countries and territories around the world. Ikeda has traveled extensively to meet with SGI members and local leaders, and has given guidance and encouragement to them. He has also initiated various peace and cultural exchanges among different regions and religions.


His contributions to peace, culture and education




In addition to his role as a Buddhist leader, Ikeda is also a prolific writer, poet, photographer, educator, and peace activist. He has authored more than 100 books on various topics such as Buddhism, philosophy, literature, art, history, science, ecology, education, and more. He has also composed more than 1,000 poems and taken more than 300,000 photographs. He has received numerous awards and honorary degrees from various institutions for his achievements in these fields.


One of his most notable contributions is his dialogue with various leaders and thinkers from different fields and backgrounds. He has engaged in dialogue with more than 1,700 people from over 100 countries, including presidents, prime ministers, Nobel laureates, scholars, artists, religious leaders, journalists, activists, and more. Some of his dialogue partners include Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Arnold Toynbee, Linus Pauling, Henry Kissinger, Andrei Sakharov, Elie Wiesel, Rosa Parks, and more. His dialogues have been published in books and journals, and have covered topics such as peace, human rights, democracy, environment, culture, education, and more.


Another contribution is his annual peace proposal that he submits to the United Nations since 1983. In his peace proposals, he offers his insights and recommendations on various global issues such as nuclear disarmament, human security, sustainable development, interfaith cooperation, humanitarian aid, and more. He also advocates for the empowerment of youth, women, and civil society as key actors for peace.


Section 2: Faith Into Action's Content and Structure




The four parts of the book and their themes




Faith Into Action is a collection of Ikeda's writings on various topics related to Buddhism and its application to daily life. The book is divided into four parts:



  • Part One: The Individual - This part focuses on how to develop one's inner potential and happiness through faith and practice. It covers themes such as human dignity, life condition, courage, justice, and more.



  • Part Two: Interpersonal Relations - This part focuses on how to cultivate harmonious relationships with others based on respect and dialogue. It covers themes such as compassion, friendship, family, work, mentor and disciple, and more.



  • Part Three: Society - This part focuses on how to contribute to the betterment of society and the world based on compassion and justice. It covers themes such as peace, culture, education, environment, health, human rights, and more.



  • Part Four: Peace - This part focuses on how to create a culture of peace and nonviolence through dialogue and action. It covers themes such as dialogue, nonviolence, global citizenship, human security, nuclear abolition, and more.



Each part consists of several chapters that contain short excerpts from Ikeda's speeches, essays, poems, letters, and dialogues. The excerpts are arranged by topic and are accompanied by brief introductions and explanations. The book also includes a foreword by Jim Garrison, president of the State of the World Forum, a preface by Ikeda himself, an afterword by Danny Nagashima, general director of SGI-USA, a glossary of Buddhist terms, and an index.


The key messages and quotes from the book




Faith Into Action is full of inspiring and insightful messages and quotes from Ikeda that can help you live a more meaningful and fulfilling life. Here are some of them:



  • "Faith is the ultimate source of our power to create happiness. It is the courage to believe in our own limitless potential." (p. 3)



  • "Wisdom is not something we are born with; it is something we acquire through diligent study and sincere practice." (p. 19)



  • "Courage is not the absence of fear; it is the determination to overcome it." (p. 35)



  • "Justice is not something that someone gives us; it is something that we create ourselves." (p. 51)



  • "Compassion is not pity or sympathy; it is the ability to empathize with others and take action for their happiness." (p. 67)



  • "Friendship is not a matter of convenience or benefit; it is a bond of trust and respect that transcends differences and distances." (p. 83)



  • "Family is not a burden or obligation; it is a source of joy and support that nurtures our growth and development." (p. 99)



  • "Work is not a means to an end; it is an expression of our creativity and contribution to society." (p. 115)



  • "The mentor-disciple relationship is not a hierarchy or dependency; it is a mutual learning and encouragement that fosters our individuality and autonomy." (p. 131)



  • "Peace is not a passive state or absence of conflict; it is an active process and presence of dialogue and cooperation." (p. 147)



  • "Culture is not a fixed or static entity; it is a dynamic and evolving phenomenon that reflects our values and aspirations." (p. 163)



  • "Education is not a mere transmission of information or skills; it is a cultivation of wisdom and character that empowers us to transform ourselves and our environment." (p. 179)



  • "Environment is not a separate or external factor; it is an integral and interdependent part of our life that affects and reflects our well-being." (p. 195)



  • "Health is not a mere absence of disease or disability; it is a state of balance and harmony that encompasses our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects." (p. 211)



  • "Human rights are not privileges or concessions; they are inherent and inalienable rights that belong to every human being regardless of race, gender, religion, nationality, or any other distinction." (p. 227)



  • "Dialogue is not a mere exchange of words or opinions; it is a sincere and respectful communication that seeks to understand and appreciate the other's perspective and experience." (p. 243)



  • "Nonviolence is not a passive resistance or submission; it is an active assertion and affirmation of life that challenges injustice and violence with courage and compassion." (p. 259)



  • "Global citizenship is not a mere identity or affiliation; it is a sense of responsibility and solidarity that transcends national and regional boundaries and embraces the whole of humanity and nature." (p. 275)



  • "Human security is not a mere protection or prevention; it is a promotion and enhancement of the dignity and well-being of all people, especially the most vulnerable and marginalized." (p. 291)



  • "Nuclear abolition is not a utopian or unrealistic goal; it is a necessary and urgent step to ensure the survival and prosperity of humanity and the planet." (p. 307)



The practical applications and examples of the book




Faith Into Action is not only a book of theory or philosophy; it is also a book of practice and action. It provides many practical applications and examples of how to apply the teachings of Buddhism and Ikeda's guidance to various situations and challenges in daily life. Here are some of them:



  • How to overcome negative emotions such as anger, fear, doubt, envy, etc. by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and transforming them into positive energy. (pp. 9-10)



  • How to develop a strong life condition that can withstand any adversity or obstacle by basing one's life on faith and practice. (pp. 13-14)



  • How to acquire wisdom by studying the teachings of Buddhism and applying them to one's life. (pp. 21-22)



  • How to cultivate courage by facing one's fears and challenges with faith and determination. (pp. 37-38)



  • How to uphold justice by standing up for what is right and fair, even if it means going against the majority or authority. (pp. 53-54)



  • How to practice compassion by empathizing with others' suffering and taking action for their happiness. (pp. 69-70)



  • How to forge friendship by respecting and trusting others, regardless of their differences or backgrounds. (pp. 85-86)



  • How to build a happy family by creating a harmonious and supportive atmosphere at home, based on mutual understanding and appreciation. (pp. 101-102)



  • How to find fulfillment in work by pursuing one's passion and contribution to society, rather than money or status. (pp. 117-118)



  • How to establish a mentor-disciple relationship by seeking guidance from someone who has achieved what one aspires to achieve, and following their example and advice. (pp. 133-134)



  • How to create peace by engaging in dialogue and cooperation with others, especially those who have different views or beliefs, rather than resorting to violence or coercion. (pp. 149-150)



  • How to foster culture by appreciating and creating various forms of art, literature, music, etc., that express one's values and aspirations. (pp. 165-166)



  • How to promote education by learning from various sources and experiences, and sharing one's knowledge and skills with others, especially the younger generation. (pp. 181-182)



  • How to protect the environment by being aware of the impact of one's actions on nature, and taking steps to reduce waste, conserve resources, and support green initiatives. (pp. 197-198)



  • How to maintain health by taking care of one's physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects, and seeking medical help when necessary. (pp. 213-214)



  • How to respect human rights by recognizing the inherent dignity and worth of every human being, and supporting their freedom and equality. (pp. 229-230)



  • How to conduct dialogue by listening attentively and sincerely to the other's perspective and experience, and expressing one's own with clarity and respect. (pp. 245-246)



  • How to practice nonviolence by rejecting any form of violence or aggression, and resolving conflicts with courage and compassion. (pp. 261-262)



  • How to become a global citizen by expanding one's awareness and concern beyond one's own country or region, and embracing the whole of humanity and nature. (pp. 277-278)



  • How to achieve nuclear abolition by raising one's voice and taking action against the threat and danger of nuclear weapons, and advocating for a world without war. (pp. 309-310)



Conclusion




A summary of the main points and a call to action




In conclusion, Faith Into Action is a book that can inspire you to live a more meaningful and fulfilling life. inner potential and happiness through faith and practice. It is a book that can help you cultivate harmonious relationships with others based on respect and dialogue. It is a book that can encourage you to contribute to the betterment of society and the world based on compassion and justice. It is a book that can enrich your knowledge and understanding of Buddhism and its relevance to modern times.


But more than that, Faith Into Action is a book that can motivate you to put your faith into action. It is a book that can challenge you to transform yourself and your environment through your own efforts and actions. It is a book that can empower you to create a culture of peace and nonviolence through dialogue and cooperation. It is a book that can urge you to become a global citizen who cares for the whole of humanity and nature.


So what are you waiting for? Download and read Faith Into Action today and discover how you can live a more meaningful and fulfilling life. You can find a free PDF copy of the book online from various sources and websites. Just make sure to respect the copyright and ethical issues involved in downloading free PDFs. And don't forget to share your thoughts and impressions of the book with others, especially with your friends and family.


Faith Into Action is not just a book; it is a way of life. It is a way of living with a positive attitude and a sense of purpose. It is a way of living with wisdom and courage. It is a way of living with compassion and justice. It is a way of living with peace and harmony.


So go ahead and put your faith into action. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Faith Into Action:



  • Q: Who is the author of Faith Into Action? A: The author of Faith Into Action is Daisaku Ikeda, the president of Soka Gakkai International (SGI), a global network of lay Buddhists that promotes peace, culture, and education.



  • Q: What is the main theme of Faith Into Action? A: The main theme of Faith Into Action is how to apply the teachings of Buddhism to daily life and create happiness for oneself and others.



  • Q: How many parts and chapters are there in Faith Into Action? A: There are four parts and 20 chapters in Faith Into Action. Each part covers a different aspect of life: Part One: The Individual; Part Two: Interpersonal Relations; Part Three: Society; Part Four: Peace.



Q: What are some of the key messages and quotes from Faith Into Action? A: Some of the key messages and quotes from Faith Into Action are:


  • "Faith is the ultimate source of our power to create happiness. It is the courage to believe in our own limitless potential." (p. 3)



  • "Wisdom is not something we are born with; it is something we acquire through diligent study and sincere practice." (p. 19)



  • "Courage is not the absence of fear; it is the determination to overcome it." (p. 35)



  • "Justice is not something that someone gives us; it is something that we create ourselves." (p. 51)



  • "Compassion is not pity or sympathy; it is the ability to empathize with others and take action for their happiness." (p. 67)



  • "Friendship is not a matter of convenience or benefit; it is a bond of trust and respect that transcends differences and distances." (p. 83)



  • "Family is not a burden or obligation; it is a source of joy and support that nurtures our growth and development." (p. 99)



  • "Work is not a means to an end; it is an expression of our creativity and contribution to society." (p. 115)



  • "The mentor-disciple relationship is not a hierarchy or dependency; it is a mutual learning and encouragement that fosters our individuality and autonomy." (p. 131)



  • "Peace is not a passive state or absence of conflict; it is an active process and presence of dialogue and cooperation." (p. 147)



  • Q: How can I get a free PDF copy of Faith Into Action? A: You can get a free PDF copy of Faith Into Action from various sources and websites online. However, you should be aware of the legal and ethical issues involved in downloading free PDFs, and respect the author's rights and wishes.



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